Waters of Life

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Utagawa Kuniyoshi スクナビコナ

“We can reject everything else: religion, ideology, all received wisdom. But we cannot escape the necessity of love and compassion…This, then, is my true religion, my simple faith. In this sense, there is no need for temple or church, for mosque or synagogue, no need for complicated philosophy, doctrine or dogma. Our own heart, our own mind, is the temple. The doctrine is compassion. Love for others and respect for their rights and dignity, no matter who or what they are: ultimately these are all we need. So long as we practice these in our daily lives, then no matter if we are learned or unlearned, whether we believe in Buddha or God, or follow some other religion or none at all, as long as we have compassion for others and conduct ourselves with restraint out of a sense of responsibility, there is no doubt we will be happy.”

His Holiness, the 14th Dalai Lama (via samsaranmusing)
Happy New Year 2013!…
Jan

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Jean Michel Basquiat

“I start a picture and I finish it. I don’t think about art while I work. I try to think about life.”

– Jean Michel Basquiat

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Happy Birthday Mark Rothko!

Happy Birthday Mark Rothko!
September 25, 1903

“I’m not an abstractionist. I’m not interested in the relationship of color or form or anything else. I’m interested only in expressing basic human emotions: tragedy, ecstasy, doom, and so on.”

Bottom: No. 61 (Rust and Blue), 1953, Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles

Source: robertwash

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Rythym From Within (photos by Michael Philip Manheim)

Michael Philip Manheim has been a professional photographer since 1969. A chance encounter with photography, at the age of 13, locked him onto a life-long pursuit. Intrigued with the themes of change and transformation, Manheim developed a signature style of layering whole phases of movement onto a single frame of film. This approach transcends a literal interpretation. He calls this series the “Rhythm from Within”.

Michael Philip Manheim’s work has been exhibited throughout the United States and in Germany, Greece and Italy. His work has been featured in magazines such as Zoom (U.S. and Italy), Photographers International (Taiwan), La Fotografia (Spain), Black and White magazine, and numerous other publications. He has been Artist in Residence at Bates College in Lewiston, ME and Phillips Exeter Academy in Exeter, NH.

Manheim’s photographs are held in public and private collections, including the Library of Congress, the International Photography Hall of Fame & Museum, the Danforth Museum of Art and the Bates College Museum of Art. He has had over 15 solo exhibitions. Julian Cox, curator of photography at Atlanta’s High Museum of Art, noted that Manheim’s photographs “have passion and beauty, and clearly considerable skill has gone into their execution.”

Music by Budd/Foxx, ‘Here and Now’
Thank you shivabel!

In T’ai Chi, every movement we make should be like a string of pearls…the beauty of the human form. – JQ

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Grouping Prints

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(Source: tamsinjohnson)

I am happy to be back to my blog (August totally disappearing due to laptop

collapse) with a new HDD up and running!

Here is a great example for hanging multiple prints/paintings. which is always a challenge.

This can very inspirational if  you are a collector of special pieces of framed art, but are in

a quandary as to how to display them tastefully.   Your collection will not look exactly like

this, but it will definitely show your own personality!  I, myself, am faced with this problem,

being one of those with an art ‘stash’ which I have recently perused!  Happy Hanging!

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Paris Tips: Embracing Dance at the Cimetière de Montmartre

Paris Tips: Embracing Dance at the Cimetière de Montmartre.

Dancers from all over the world leave their ballet slippers at Marie Taglioni’s Shrine

in the Cimetière de Montmartre, Paris.

via one of my favorite blogs…People, Places and Bling!

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There is a certain thrill unlocking the message from a poem written in another language other than one’s own.

The Rag Tree

I cut my translator’s teeth in High School reading French novels with fairly sophisticated vocabulary (actually, the one I recall was science fiction). Leaving Paris after graduation, I had little time to continue my education in French literature–learning America was challenge enough. But recently I bought a book of 19th Century French verse with the original French texts in the back. So in the last couple of weeks Stephane Mallarme’s work has caught my attention.

Mallarme’s work is about as different from Gilgamesh as you can get. Whereas Gilgamesh tends to be precise and economical, wedded to the concrete, Mallarme was a poet of the emotions dedicated to the concept of pure poetry. His work is deliberately ambiguous and so challenges the translator to read more closely and consider unusual approaches to bringing a poem over into his own language. In particular, Mallarme’s minimal grammar and complex, multilayered images are both…

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