Archive for January, 2012

This fascinating photography post comes from http://www.chicquero.com. All of these nature prints combined with the female figure symbolize the connection with women and nature…mother earth. I find these photos quite lovely.

Chicquero

Cecilia Paredes was born in Lima, Peru.
The photography of Paredes constitutes and attempts to demonstrate that the body of the women – her own body – is a sacred zone, not profane, to restore its perception as something miraculous amidst the technological chaos that currently surrounds us.

Cecilia is interested in using art to explore the boundaries of nature. As a photographer, she often uses her own body as a medium for presenting a dialog between the spirit and the natural world. Working with her assistants, she creates photo performance based works that have her seamlessly blended into backgrounds. Acting as both the photographer and the subject, she uses make-up, body paint and any costume she needs to make her virtually disappear.

Camouflage is a game we all like to play, but our secrets are as surely revealed by what we want to seem to be as by what we…

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A True Friend

A True Friend

“A true friend is the one who holds your hand and touches your heart.”

—Gabriel García Márquez

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This is such a useful feature, and an easy way to share rich  information with all of your followers. This is my first REBLOG…checkin’ it out to see how it works. I think I am going to love it.

The WordPress.com Blog

As we mentioned last week, you can like and reblog posts directly from your reader, which displays a stream of all the updates published on all the blogs you follow from your WordPress.com account.

We’ve also brought the reblog button back to the toolbar that appears at the top of the screen when you’re logged into WordPress.com. Note that you’ll only see the like and reblog options while you’re looking at individual posts.

For example, you’ll see this on the left side of your toolbar while viewing http://en.blog.wordpress.com/2012/01/20/read-blogs:

And your toolbar will look like this while you’re browsing the home page of en.blog.wordpress.com:

How does reblogging work?

Reblogging is a quick way to share posts published by other WordPress.com users on your own blog. People have been reblogging others’ posts since blogging started, but our new reblogging system enables authors to retain greater control over their content.

When…

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Drinking Tea Alone

Drinking Tea Alone

“drinking tea alone—
every day the butterfly
stops by”

Issa

(via yama-bato)

Butterfly – detail of a larger flower scroll.
The painting dates from the Song period.

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Mosaico 116: Condensado del 2011

The holidays are over and it is a great time to listen to some Latin Groove.  I found this great mix on 8tracks.com, and want to share it with you.  Brazilian tunes have always been my passion, and these rank up there.  Just click on the link and ENJOY.

mosaico-116-condensado-del-2011

Los temas que más nos gustaron de este 2011, todos juntos en este Mosaico. Global sounds, brazilian grooves, latin, urban beats y más, un condensado del 2011 con mucho sabor. 
http://www.mosaico-elprograma.blogspot.com/2012/01/mosaico-116-cond…

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It’s All Really One

But if you go beyond that, you see it’s all really One.

Source: beach-demon

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Ernesto Che Guevara

Ernesto Che Guevara 

In 1999 I was visiting Cuba during the 40th celebration of the Cuban Revolution (1953-1959).  Havana was in  full celebration throughout the city and along The Malecón,  ( broad esplanade, roadway and seawall which stretches for 8 km along the coast in HavanaCuba).  One of the things I will never forget is running into a group of women in high spirits shouting ‘We love Che!  He is our ‘martyr’.  At that moment I especially realized the incredible importance of Ernesto Che Guevara to the Cuban people.  The following is a contemplation of this special man.  -J. Quigley

“In 1956 Guevara, Castro and eighty other men and women arrived in Cuba in an attempt to overthrow the government of General Fulgencio Batista. This group became known as the July 26 Movement. The plan was to set up their base in the Sierra Maestra mountains. On the way to the mountains they were attacked by government troops. By the time they reached the Sierra Maestra there were only sixteen men left with twelve weapons between them. For the next few months Castro’s guerrilla army raided isolated army garrisons and were gradually able to build-up their stock of weapons.

When the guerrillas took control of territory they redistributed the land amongst the peasants. In return, the peasants helped the guerrillas against Batista’s soldiers. In some cases the peasants also joined Castro’s army, as did students from the cities and occasionally Catholic priests.

In an effort to find out information about the rebels people were pulled in for questioning. Many innocent people were tortured. Suspects, including children, were publicly executed and then left hanging in the streets for several days as a warning to others who were considering joining the revolutionaries. The behaviour of Batista’s forces increased support for the guerrillas. In 1958 forty-five organizations signed an open letter supporting the July 26 Movement. National bodies representing lawyers, architects, dentists, accountants and social workers were amongst those who signed. Castro, who had originally relied on the support of the poor, was now gaining the backing of the influential middle classes.

In its first hundred days in office Castro’s government passed several new laws. Rents were cut by up to 50 per cent for low wage earners; property owned by Fulgencio Batista and his ministers was confiscated; the telephone company was nationalized and the rates were reduced by 50 per cent; land was redistributed amongst the peasants (including the land owned by the Castro family); separate facilities for blacks and whites (swimming pools, beaches, hotels, cemeteries etc.) were abolished.”

via warriorsrise:

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